Individuals with their relationships and beliefs define the society in which they live. New data and innovative methods will provide an opportunity to observe individual relationships and their impact on political, social and cultural behaviour, and the subsequent impact on economic growth and development.

 

Distributional Health Consequences of Wildfire Air Pollution

Patrick Baylis

Assistant Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

Understanding the distributional consequences of air pollution is a fundamental input into health care and tax policy. This project will investigate the effect of air pollution on human health and healthcare utilization, and examine how these effects differ across socioeconomic status (SES) groups, and identify the underlying mechanisms driving these differences.

 

Collateral Damage: The Legacy of the Laos Secret War

Juan Felipe Riaño

Ph.D. Candidate in Economics

U.S. conducted a “Secret War” in Laos from 1964-1973, making it the most heavily bombed country per capita in human history This project documents the negative long-term impact of conflict on economic and social development, using highly disaggregated data on bombing campaigns and nighttime satellites.

 

Census Linking: A Bounds Approach

Sam Hwang

Assistant Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

This projects proposes a new ‘bounding’ method to link large-scale datasets that lack unique identifiers. Aim is to study the bias created by sample selection when using historical US Census data in applied empirical work.

 

Meritocratic promotion during China’s corruption crackdown

Patrick Francois

Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

Aim of the study is to understand how meritocratic promotion affected China’s GDP before and after the 2012 corruption crackdown.

 

A large procurement auctions data set as a source of identification

David Green

Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

The objective of this project is to obtain a large administrative data set. It contains firm-specific quasi experimental shocks that will be useful in the study of labour markets and firm behaviour.

 

The Real Effects of Accounting Measurement

Alexander Bleck

Assistant Professor, UBC Sauder School of Business

This project deals with the use of innovative regulatory data to test a theory of bank Regulation. The theory provides an explanation for the contribution of accounting standards in the banking sector to the financial crisis.

 

Developing a public archive of choice data to support modeling of individual differences in investment risk tolerance

Dale Griffin

Professor, UBC Sauder School of Business

In this study researchers proposes to work with the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) to measure the risk attitudes of a sample of investors who are working with financial investors to develop a retirement investment plan. Goal is to create a choice-based measure that is relatively brief and simple.

 

Trust Unraveled: The Long Shadow of the Spanish Civil War

Valencia C Felipe

Assistant Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

This project aims to study the impact of the Spanish Civil War on social capital, using geo-located data on historical mass graves and disaggregated modern-day survey data on trust.

 

Nepotism and State Capacity Building Family Networks and the persistence of Bureaucrats in the Public Service

Juan Felipe Riaño

Ph.D. candidate in Economics

Supervisor: Francesco Trebbi

This project will focus on the role of family networks and nepotism in the formation and persistence of bureaucratic elites in developing countries. This study will help to study the determinants of state capacity and the functioning of bureaucracies in developing countries.

 

Local Council Elections in Uganda

Siwan Anderson

Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

For the first time since 2002, local-level democratic elections are going to be held this summer in rural Uganda. One unique component of this election is the voting procedure. This project will conduct an observational study of this unique election process.

 

What Does Health Insurance Insure? Evidence From Big Data on Insurer Coverage Decisions

Joshua Gottlieb

Associate Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

Health care is a complicated business, which makes health insurance a complex part of insurance. Health insurers has to make complex coverage decisions and there is no research studies available to study these coverage decisions. This study will use innovative methods with big data to understand insurance coverage decisions in the US which can be applicable within Canadian province as well.

 

Cousin marriage in the U.S.

Munir Squires

Assistant Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

The cross-country correlation between rates of cousin marriage and economic and political outcomes is strongly negative. Causation is unclear, but cousin marriage may impede integration, societal trust, and political participation by sustaining tightly knit clan structures. This proposal will study this question by exploiting US state-level legislation banning cousin marriage in the 19th and early 20th century.

 

Census Linkage and Longitudinal Data: 1900-40

Henry Siu

Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

The purpose of the project is to create longitudinal data for the US between 1900-1940 by linking individuals across decennial US Censuses, that are now available in their entirety. This will allow researchers to study issues regarding mobility—geographical, occupational, intergenerational—during the early 20th Century.

 

Data Science and Scientific Computing Infrastructure for Classes and Research

Jesse Perla

Assistant Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

This project will help to help build and host a data-science course intended to have its own course-code in the new “technical” stream bachelors; provide computational infrastructure for the PhD class; and to provide computational infrastructure for Julia/Python/R to “democratize” access to the Compute Canada cluster.

 

How Trust, Beliefs and Information Help Institutions Work: Field Experiments on ROSCAs in the Congo

Patrick Francois

Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

The importance of institutions is a central topic of economic development. Despite this importance little is understood about what makes institutions function better in some settings than in others. We propose to test the effect of pro-social values (such as trust or altruism) in the functioning of a common and economically relevant institution.

 

Longitudinal Data on Academic Careers

Marit Rehavi

Associate Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

This project will use CV data of the individuals from EconJobMarket (EJM) and from PhD economists’ subsequent CVs into a longitudinal data set of the careers of every economist who’s received a PhD in North America since 2009. These data will be paired with job application data from EJM to create a complete data set of initial conditions at the time of the job market and early career outcomes. This study will help to match and to test for gender disparities.

 

The Health Consequences of Coal-Fired Power Plants: Evidence from the Fracking Revolution

Joshua Gottlieb

Associate Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

Innovative machine learning techniques will be used to determine the consequences of the shift from coal to natural gas, due to the fracking revolution, on the air quality. Further effects of changing air pollution will be measured on illness, hospitalization, and mortality among the Medicare population.

 

Testing the No Safety School Theorem Using Field Data

Sam Hwang

Assistant Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

Administrative data set from Ontario Universities’ application Centre would be used to test whether high school students’ choice of college application portfolios is consistent with the No Safety School Theorem. These findings would have implications for researchers who model simultaneous search problems and researchers interested in post-secondary education.

 

Natural language processing for economic research: Defending against air pollution in Delhi

Patrick Baylis

Assistant Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

Natural language processing of geo-located statements on social media in combination with data from recently deployed pollution monitors will be used to estimate the extent to which localized information on environmental threats is incorporated into households’ daily activity choices. This study will uncover hidden relationships between social media content such as tweet and local unemployment conditions.

 

Since when did Education Matter: a study of 19th Century English Education

Mauricio Drelichman

Associate Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

This project will study the effects of education on intergenerational mobility, using British census and parish school data from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Probabilistic matching, big data methods, and optical character recognition software will be used to link census records and parish education data. This information would be useful to study the relationship between education and labour market outcomes.

 

The Evolution of Wealth Inequality in Canada between 1982 and 2014: A New Perspective Based on Newly Combined Data on Assets and Liabilities

Giovanni Gallipoli

Associate Professor, Vancouver School of Economics

The objective of this project is to characterize both the level and evolution of wealth (net worth) inequality in Canada between 1982 and 2014. It will further examine its effects on different groups based on gender, age, family structure, region of residence, income, and portfolio composition. It will provide detailed overview of the distribution of net worth within Canada.

 

Innovative Use of Data for Better Gatekeeping in Emergency Department

Yichuan (Daniel) Ding

Assistant Professor, UBC Sauder School of Business

The decision to admit an emergency department (ED) visitor to the inpatient units or discharged home is constantly being made by the ED doctors every day. This proposal will study some non-clinical factors that help guide those decisions.