PhD Job Market Candidates

The Vancouver School of Economics is pleased to introduce the following job market candidates for your consideration.

Please view a candidate’s full profile by clicking on their name.

PhD Job Market Candidate

My research interests are in Macroeconomics and Labour Economics, with a specific focus on the role played by intra-household bargaining in the determination of the household’s behaviour in the labour market.

PhD Job Market Candidate

My research interests are in Household Finance and International Macroeconomics. My job market paper investigates how consumption smoothing by households varies over the business cycle.

PhD Job Market Candidate

I am a job market candidate at the Vancouver School of Economics, the University of British Columbia.
My research interests are in Industrial Organization and Econometrics.

PhD Job Market Candidate

My research interest is in Applied Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics, with specific focus on expectation formation and learning. I also have special interest in applying Deep Learning tools to economic problems.

PhD Job Market Candidate

I am a job market candidate at the Vancouver School of Economics. My research is at the intersection of time-series Econometrics and Macroeconomics. My job market paper is concerned with econometric modeling of persistent, low-frequency cycles. I also study their implications for empirical Macroeconomics.

PhD Job Market Candidate

My research interests are in Labour Economics; in particular, the relationship between public institutions and individual labour market outcomes in both developed and developing countries.

PhD Job Market Candidate

I am a job market candidate at the Vancouver School of Economics, University of British Columbia. My research interest lay in the Economics of Crime, Law and Economics, Public Economics, and Applied Econometrics.

My job market paper explores the effect of early release incentives for incarcerated individuals. Using a regression discontinuity design I find that in the absence of these incentives rehabilitative effort while incarcerated is reduced and recidivism risk after release increases. I Apply the Causal Forest Algorithm to be used in the Regression Discontinuity framework and show significant heterogeneity in these estimated treatment effects. This heterogeneity reveals that early release incentives matter even for more serious offenders (i.e. those with more extensive criminal records and those convicted of more serious crimes).

I will be available for interview during the 2020/2021 Canadian Economics Employment Exchange, European Economic Association conferences, and American Economic Association conferences. I expect to graduate in 2021.

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