Nisha Malhotra

Associate Professor of Teaching

INSTRUCTOR & RESEARCHER

My expertise is in translating traditional pedagogy and emerging technology & learning approaches into applicable curricula focused on student success.

My research interests range from topics of Trade, Development, Gender and Global Health. The common thread in my work is the use of empirical approaches rooted in statistics and econometrics to address contemporary policy questions.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, BC 2007 to Present

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF TEACHING  (2015 to Present)

  • Spearheaded the Community-Based Research initiative for seminar course ECON 490 to bring community organizations and students together to enhance learning and research.
  • Develop and maintain online resources in economics, political science, and related fields on Statistics, Econometrics and statistical computing skills. https://blogs.ubc.ca/datawithstata/
  • Open Education Resources – TEXTBOOKS
      – Optimal, Integral, Likely: Optimization, Integral Calculus, And Probability For Students Of Commerce And The Social Sciences, By B. Belevan, P. Hamidi, N. Malhotra, And E. Yeager, Open-Source Textbook, Cc By-Nc-Sa 4.0),  2021.
      – Study Practice Guide: Optimal, Integral, Likely: Optimization, Integral Calculus, And Probability For Students Of Commerce And The Social Sciences, By B. Belevan, P. Hamidi, N. Malhotra, And E. Yeager, Open-Source Textbook, Cc By-Nc-Sa 4.0), 2021.

COORDINATOR & PRINCIPAL ADVISOR, UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS PROGRAMME, VSE (2011)

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF TEACHING, VSE (2010 to 2015)

Piloted numerous UBC initiatives to enhance student learning. Developed, Evaluated and implemented Curricula to incorporate asynchronous content and social media.

  • Designed and taught VSE’s first flexible learning course, Introduction to Microeconomics, in order to incorporate active learning, course replace 15% of traditional lectures with online tutorials.
  • Initiated an intensive 3-day preparatory course for International Relations (IR) students enrolled in ECON 355: Introduction to International Trade. Now hosted online as a program resource.
  • Introduced Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS) to engender collaborative research skills in VSE.
  • Undertook (Competitive) Flexible Learning Initiative to construct an online resource repository (lectures, pre-lecture quizzes, peer assessments, etc.) for ECON 101.
  • PEER MENTORING – Cheryl Fu, 2013; Robert Gateman 2014, Ashok Kotwal, 2015; Thomas S., 2015

SESSIONAL LECTURER: Economics (2007 To 2009); Faculty Of Land & Food Systems (2008)

ADDITIONAL EXPERIENCE

  • CONSULTANT, DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS RESEARCH GROUP | The World Bank, USA
  • CONSULTANT, OPERATIONS EVALUATION DEPARTMENT (OED) | The World Bank, USA
  • RESEARCH ASSOCIATE | Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations, New Delhi, India
  • LECTURER | University of Delhi, Department of Economics, New Delhi, India
  • BUSINESS ANALYST | Thomas Cook, New Delhi, India

 

CURRENT PROJECTS

PUBLICATIONS

Despite spectacular economic growth over the last three decades, there continues to be widespread malnutrition in India. Consequently, between 2005 and 2006, an alarming 43 percent of children under three years old were stunted, 48 percent were underweight, and 17 percent were wasted. Indeed, income constraints can lead to malnutrition, but government policies, cultural norms, and lack of education are also some of the many determinants of malnutrition.
Using the NFHS, I confirm that following the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on child nutrition make a significant difference to anthropometric measures of Indian children.
Furthermore, I argue that poverty alone is not responsible for malnutrition. In fact, 20 percent of parents from the top 40 percent income group do not give supplementary solid food to their six- to eight-month-old infants, which I attribute to a lack of information on sound nutritional practices.
Keywords
[go to text"]

The pandemic has shone a light on this global health crisis and brought the discussion of women’s rights to a safe environment to the forefront. Canada identified its first case of COVID-19 on January 25, 2020. By the end of March, all provinces had declared a state of emergency. Businesses, schools, offices, stores, daycare facilities shut down, and measures to physically isolate people within their homes quickly became the norm. As a result, homes are unsafe for most victims of partner violence.
In 2018, 50% of intimate partner violence reported to police occurred in homes occupied by both the victims and the abusers. A lockdown requiring victims to spend longer hours in proximity to their abuser is likely to increase the frequency and intensity of violent episodes. And since 80% of victims of intimate partner violence in Canada are women, they face a disproportionately higher impact of measures taken during a pandemic. [LINK

Aim: To examine the role of maternal diet in determining the low birth weight (LBW) in Indian infants.

Methods: Data from the National Family Health Survey (2005–06) were used. Multivariate regression analysis was used to analyse the effect of maternal diet on infant birth weight.

Results: Infants whose mothers consumed milk and curd daily [odds ratio (OR), 1.17; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06–1.29]; fruits daily (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07–1.36) or weekly (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02–1.24) had higher odds of not having a low birth weight baby. The daily consumption of pulses and beans (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.02–1.36) increased the odds, while weekly consumption of fish (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.70–0.89) decreased the odds of not having an LBW infant. In addition, intake of iron-folic acid supplements during pregnancy increased birth weight by 6.46 g per month.
[go to paper]

In this paper, we examine the barriers and the facilitating factors for seeking treatment for childhood diarrhoea and to determine the main causes for delay in seeking treatment. Data from Indian Demographic and Health Survey 2005-06 (NFHS-III) were used. Mothers were asked whether i) their children (<5-years) had suffered from diarrhoea during the 2 weeks preceding the survey, ii) if treatment was sought, and iii) the number of days waited to seek treatment after the diarrhoea had started. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to find the determinants of seeking treatment at the health facility and the factors responsible for the 'delay' in seeking advice/treatment.
[go to text"]

Why does child malnutrition persist in India? This column argues that the reason is not limited to poverty or inadequate access to food but that a lack of knowledge about healthy nutrition plays a vital role.

Nutrition advice on feeding infants and children provided by health professionals is shown to be strongly correlated with improved feeding practices across all age groups. If information about feeding children is the key obstacle to improving nutrition, then there is hope; it will be easier to resolve the problem of scarce information than to resolve the problem of acute poverty.

[go to text]

Why does child malnutrition persist in India? Amongst the fastest-growing economies over the last two decades, India has struggled to make progress in the health of its children. In this article, the author argues that the reason malnutrition persists is not limited to poverty or inadequate access to food; but that a lack of nutritional knowledge amongst families plays a very important role.

Scientific Abstract Objective: Despite a rapidly growing economy and rising income levels in India, improvements in child malnutrition have lagged. Data from the most recent National Family Health Survey reveal that the infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices recommended by the WHO and the Indian Government, including the timely introduction of solid food, are not being followed by a majority of mothers in India. Thus, it is puzzling that even among rich households, children are not being fed adequately. The present study analyses the socio-economic factors that contribute to this phenomenon, including the role of nutritional information.

[go to paper]

The objective of this paper is to identify demographic, social and behavioural risk factors for HIV infection among men in Zambia. In particular, the role of alcohol, condom use, and the number of sex partners is highlighted as being significant in the prevalence of HIV.
The survey included socio-economic variables and HIV serostatus for consenting men (N = 4,434). The risk for HIV was positively related to wealth status. Men who considered themselves to be at high risk for HIV-positive were most likely to be HIV-positive. Respondents who, along with their sexual partner, were drunk during the last three times they had sexual intercourse were more likely to be HIV-positive (Adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.60; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00-2.56). Men with more than two sexual life partners and inconsistent condom use had a higher risk for being HIV-positive (OR: 1.89; 95% CI: 1.45-2.46 and OR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.10-2.02, respectively). HIV prevention programs in Zambia should focus even more on these behavioural risk factors.

[go to paper]

This paper sets out a simple non-cooperative model of resource allocation within the household in developing countries that incorporates domestic violence as an instrument for enhancing bargaining power. We demonstrate that the extent of domestic violence faced by women is not necessarily declining in their reservation utilities nor necessarily increasing in their spouses’. Using the National Family Health Survey data of India for 1998-99, we isolate the e¤ect of domestic violence on female autonomy, taking into account the possible two-way causality through the choice of appropriate instruments. We provide some evidence for the evolutionary theory of domestic violence, which argues that such violence stems from the jealousy caused by paternity uncertainty in our evolutionary past. The findings have strong policy implications suggesting that it will take more than an improvement in women's employment options to address the problem of spousal violence.

[go to paper]

In this article, we analyze whether the Softwood Lumber Agreement between the United States and Canada imposed significant economic costs on industries that use softwood lumber in the United States. To ascertain this impact, we use an event study. Our event study analyzes variations in the stock prices of lumber-using firms listed at the major stock markets in the United States. We find that the news of events leading to the Softwood Lumber Agreement had significant negative impacts on the stock prices of industries using softwood lumber. The average reduction of stock prices for our sample of firms was approximately 5.42% over all the events considered. Article first published online: 20 OCT 2009

[go to paper]

The main aim is to question why we don't see more firms petitioning for import relief. It is well accepted that petitioning itself can restrain imports, lead to higher prices and hence higher profits (in the short run). What prevents more firms from filing for protection? It may be that petitioning reflects cost inefficiency on the part of the petitioning firm, and concerns about revealing this information might act as a deterrent for firms to come forward with their complaints. However, in a declining industry where a large number of firms are contemplating an exit, petitioning could be a signal that the firm expects to remain in the market for the near future. The signalling hypothesis is tested by comparing the stock market response of an antidumping petition for petitioning firms and non-petitioning firms producing the same product.

link to paper unavailable.

In this article, we highlight the anticompetitive nature of antidumping (AD) legislation. Antidumping legislation was set up to protect domestic firms from predatory pricing by foreign firms. We argue that protecting highly concentrated industries drastically reduces competition at home. In cases where the industry consists only of one or two firms, import restrictions may breed monopolies at the expense of domestic consumers. This article looks at cases filed by the agriculture sector and at the market concentration of industries in this sector to illustrate the above possibility. We study the case of fresh tomatoes in detail to further demonstrate the anticompetitive nature of AD legislation. We show the effect of AD legislation on imports, as well as the change in the Lerner index in the fresh tomato industry.

[go to paper]

In this paper, we analyze whether U.S. Anti-Dumping (AD) duties in the agricultural sector are effective in restricting trade. More specifically, does the imposition of an antidumping duty restrict imports of the named commodity, or is there a diversion in the supply of imports from countries named in the petition to countries not named in the antidumping petition? We find that AD duties have had a significant impact on the imports of agricultural commodities from the countries named in the petition. However, our results also indicate that, unlike the manufacturing sector in the US, there was little trade diversion towards countries not named in the AD petition. Our results indicate that AD is a plausible protectionist policy in the Agriculture sector.

[go to paper]

In order to develop effective policies and programs that reduce the number of smokers, a necessary first step is to understand the determinants of starting to smoke. In this paper, we present a split-sample duration model of the decision to start smoking. We use data from the 2002 Canadian tobacco use monitoring survey. The hazard rate of starting smoking peaks sharply at age 15 and quickly declines thereafter. Our parametric estimates provide evidence that gender, education, marital status, and household size are important determinants of smoking habits. We also find that higher cigarette prices have an impact on picking up the habit, but not on the initiation age. Thus, the results highlight the importance of cigarette taxes in influencing the likelihood of smoking.

[go to paper]

We estimate the degree of trade diversion from provinces named under the Softwood Lumber Agreement(SLA) to provinces not named. Our regression results indicate that the SLA had a significant impact on the exports of non-named SLA provinces. Controlling for other factors, the SLA by itself would have increased exports from these provinces four times. The corresponding effect for the provinces named in the SLA is estimated at minus 5 percent. This decrease is not, however, statistically significant.

[go to paper]

WORKING PAPERS

In this paper, we compare the use of antidumping (AD) measures in the agriculture sector by Canada and the United States, the two major users of antidumping procedures.1 We consider both the direct and indirect effects of the AD measure and consider what factors make an AD measure more or less successful at impeding trade and when it is more likely to cause trade diversion. Specifically, we ask when the imposition of an antidumping duty restricts imports of the targeted commodity, and when is there a deflection in the supply of imports from countries named in the petition to countries not named in the antidumping petition? We compare these results with that of the US and draw conclusions about the determinants of such differences, like the exchange rate, GDP and distance to partner countries. We use a modified version of the gravity model, as used in the earlier literature (Prusa (2001)) for our analysis. We find that affirmative AD cases caused trade diversion from non-named countries for agricultural products in general, but that trade diversion was particularly strong for perishable products. We also find that the more concentrated the imports, the more restrictive the AD duties.

[go to paper]


WORK IN PROGRESS

As part of UBC’s initiative to facilitate community-based learning, this course gave students the option of participating in a research project that helps a non-profit organization gain a better understanding of a specific issue. Whereas most undergraduate economic curricula focus on theory or data analysis, Community-Based Research (CBR) lets students use their theoretical knowledge and analytical skills to help people in their own community.

[go to paper]

I use the Indian National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3) data collected in 2006 to study the determinants of a mother's decision to breastfeed her child and social factors that influence the duration of breastfeeding. More specifically, I examine the influence of family structure, and gender of the child on a mother's choice to either breastfeed exclusively, supplement breast milk or not breastfeed her child. I do not find any gender bias in the choice to breastfeed an infant- more than 95% of the children in the sample are breastfed. The duration of family structure is surprisingly a strong determinant of the duration of breastfeeding. Women living in joint families breastfeed for a significantly shorter duration.
link to paper not available.

http://works.bepress.com/nisha_malhotra/

 


 

Winter 2021

ECON255 Understanding Globalization Sections

Social and economic implications for both rich and poor countries of lowered barriers to the international flows of information, capital, labour and goods. May not be taken for credit by students with fourth-year standing.

Winter 2021

ECON355 Introduction to International Trade Sections

The determinants of trade patterns, trade policy, tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade, political economy of protectionism, bilateral and multilateral trade disputes, trade liberalization, trade and development. Credit may be obtained for only one of ECON 355 and 455.


Enhancing Traditional Pedagogy 

As part of UBC’s initiative to facilitate community-based research (UBC-CBR/CLI), this course offered research projects in participation with Community organizations. Whereas most undergraduate 4th year economic curricula focus on theory or data analysis, Community-Based Research (CBR) lets students use their theoretical knowledge and analytical skills to help people in their own community. I was recognized for adopting a “pedagogical approach in partnering with diverse community organizations and enabling students to engage in community-based projects”


Article- Crunching the Numbers on Vancouver’s Affordable Housing Crisis: Econ Students Team Up with Vancouver Rent Bank NICCSS for Community-Based Research (2012-2014), Annual Alumni Newsletter, Vancouver School of Economics, UBC

Last year’s Occupy movement prompted many of us to re-evaluate our assumptions about poverty. At UBC, four students in Dr. Nisha Malhotra’s Economics 490 class—Gender, Population and Health—took that evaluation one step further. As part of UBC’s initiative to facilitate community-based learning, this course gave students the option of participating in a research project that helps a non-profit organization better understand a specific issue. Whereas most undergraduate economic curricula focus on theory or data analysis, Community-Based Research (CBR) lets students use their theoretical knowledge and analytical skills to help people in their own community.

You get a degree in econ, but when you go out into the real world you’ll be interacting with real people and using layman’s terms. Research should be based on collaboration, and CBR really offers that experience.” Tommy Chan
[Read Full Article]

Using adapting Blended Learning aimed to enhance student's educational experience by incorporating more active learning in the classroom. A percentage (roughly 15%) of traditional lecture-style classes were substituted with asynchronous video tutorials. This increases class time for problem-solving and student discussions.

--Optimal, Integral, Likely: Optimization, Integral Calculus, And Probability For Students Of Commerce And The Social Sciences, By B. Belevan, P. Hamidi, N. Malhotra, And E. Yeager, Open-Source Textbook, Cc By-Nc-Sa 4.0), 2021. [Link]

--Study Practice Guide: Optimal, Integral, Likely: Optimization, Integral Calculus, And Probability For Students Of Commerce And The Social Sciences, By B. Belevan, P. Hamidi, N. Malhotra, And E. Yeager, Open-Source Textbook, Cc By-Nc-Sa 4.0), 2021. [Link]

--Developed and maintain online resources Statistics, Econometrics and Research Methodology for students and faculty in economics, political science, and related fields. Data with STATA  [Link to the website]

--An online resource repository for Microeconomics: lectures, pre-lecture quizzes, peer assessments, etc. for ECON 101  [Link to the Website]


 

Published Articles

A screencast generally consists of a recording of the computer screen, along with the instructor’s commentary. Although easy to produce, this visual and auditory format is an excellent way to narrate presentations, explain concepts, answer students’ questions, and demonstrate how to use software and navigate websites. In addition, screencast videos have been shown to help students gain a deeper understanding of the material and also to enhance their engagement with the course content.

Many theories provide the basis for developing and using screencast tutorial videos as a pedagogical tool in online courses. One such theory is the cognitive theory of multimedia, which explains the benefits of integrating education with multimedia for online learners, especially through screencasting’s audio-video format. An empirical study by Lloyd and Robinson (2012) compared the effectiveness of text tutorials and screencasts. It showed that screencasts were a more effective learning tool for imparting higher-order, conceptual knowledge. The authors attributed their success to the dual learning channels (i.e., visual and verbal processing) that screencasts provide. (Link to the Article)

Reducing the vast number of theories down to adaptable elements for my economics courses was honestly a process of trial and error. I struggled with time and questions such as: How much class time should be devoted to active learning and participation? Should this be at the expense of course content? Given that first-year undergraduate economics courses are mostly preparatory for advanced economics classes, the content of these courses is not up for debate, and none can be sacrificed. The solution was to use a blended learning approach: modifying the course structure, introducing online videos for review, and changing how the content was delivered in class.

The action plan for student engagement varies by class size. In smaller, fourth-year undergraduate classes with an average class size of 12-18 students, it is easy to interact with students while analyzing or discussing real-world issues.  Of course, smaller class size is inherently more conducive to active learning. Furthermore, it helps to have suitable physical space and flexible seating to allow students to form groups and have discussions within and between groups.  While students solve problems or apply concepts, I transition between groups to try and help them assimilate new information while making the right connections with what they already know.

Larger classes are, however, a big challenge. An average class size of a first-year economics course can consist of 80 to 150 students. It is, thus, not feasible to interact with every group.  After much thought, I decided to rely on peer interaction and trust that students, if asked, might engage in solving posed problems. The aim was to only ‘spark’ a discussion, not a debate. I wanted students to at least question their knowledge. (Link to the Article)

The participation and discussion rates were higher than ever and more problem-solving, and other requests were made for help with the course. This module helped achieve what face-to-face, three-hours a week interaction could not. Therefore, I have decided to make this technology a permanent feature in my course. However, next semester, we will have a closed Facebook group. This is what I have learned:

  • A Facebook page creates a public presence online. Anyone on the Internet, even those that don’t have a Facebook account, can view this page. By default, comments can be viewed by anyone on the Internet. (Pineda)
  • Students tend to be concerned about their online persona – saying something unintelligent is a big concern. (Selwyn) As a result, they are less likely to participate on a Facebook page than a closed group.
  • Facebook groups resemble an online café with walls to the rest of the online community, allowing students to (a) chat in real-time, (b) discuss in virtual-time, and (c) share materials through straightforward file upload.
  • Facebook groups can be open (public), closed (require administrator approval for joining and only members can read the posts), or secret (only members can see the group, who’s in it, and what’s being posted).
  • Students prefer a closed group. They are apprehensive about asking questions in open groups where their Facebook friends can judge them as scholastically inept. (Selwyn)

As for the benefits of creating a Facebook group for your course, not only am I seeing better online interactions and face-to-face discussions, but it’s a fantastic way to get mid-semester feedback from the students. (Link to the Article)

To research social issues, students must have an understanding of human behaviour, culture, and socioeconomic foundations. Peer discussions, which often generate positive externalities, can lead to a greater understanding of the costs and benefits of various policies and behaviours (Van Den Berg, Admiraal, & Pilot, 2006). While the interaction between the professor and students is mostly at the individual level, peer discussions are at the individual level, in small group settings, or large groups.

The use of social media that students have previously been using and accustomed to provides a cost and free effective medium for discussion and interaction (Lockyer, Dawson, & Heathcote, 2010). The class also has a Facebook page for students from previous semesters and the current sessions, to interact and offer assistance. I visit the Facebook page weekly to answer questions, post new research articles, and highlight events that might be helpful (e.g., writing classes, offers of free proofreading at the English Institute, and scholarly presentations in different departments, etc.). To keep students motivated and on track, frequent feedback is provided as they carry out their research projects. All of the assignments and submissions build on each other and will be used for compiling a final report, which creates a trajectory for the final research paper at the end of the semester. Rubrics for assessment are indicated at the beginning of the course so that students will have a good understanding of the expectations for their research analyses.

Given a constraint on time, a choice had to be made between allocating time to in-class lectures or having individual meetings with the students. My past experience reveals that unless students are required to use the learned material within a short span of time - lectures are quickly forgotten or at times ignored. This thought is also reinforced by the viewing statistics from my YouTube channel: YouTube STATA tutorials were viewed only 1 to 5 days prior to the proposal's due dates regardless of when these videos were posted or announced in class. Therefore, videos of required material were posted (STATA and Econometrics), which allowed students to view the lectures whenever they needed the material. This allowed me to allocate a greater number of office hours dealing with individual questions.

Another decision I struggled with was the assessment of class participation/discussion: how to grade students anxious about public speaking or who are in general quieter and shy. Having a place to post comments and participate without the public eye - should be helpful and encourage involvement from the shy student (Larson, B.E. & Keiper, T.A., 2002). Thus, student-led interaction on the class Facebook page has been assigned a grade, resolving to some extent my concern with assessing participation. ( Link to the Article)


Instructional Development & Curriculum Design workshops for faculty members at UBC, hosted by CTLT. 2012-2021


 


Optimal, Integral, Likely
Optimization, Integral Calculus, and Probability
for Students of Commerce and the Social Sciences

Bruno Belevan, Parham Hamidi, Nisha Malhotra, Elyse Yeager
Adapted from CLP Calculus by Joel Feldman, Andrew Rechnitzer, and Elyse Yeager

CONTENT

 

1 Vectors and Geometry in Two & Three Dimensions

2 Partial Derivatives

3 Integration

4 Probability

5 Sequence and Series

A Proofs and Supplements

B High school material

[Download Textbook PDF]

 


CONTENT

I. Questions

1 Vectors and Geometry in Two and Three Dimensions; 2 Partial Derivatives; 3 Integration; 4 Probability

II. Hints to Questions

1 Vectors and Geometry in Two and Three Dimensions; 2 Partial Derivatives; 3 Integration; 4 Probability

III. Solutions to Questions

1 Vectors and Geometry in Two and Three Dimensions; 2 Partial Derivatives; 3 Integration; 4 Probability

[Download Practice Book PDF]

Licenses and Attributions

Copyright © 2020 Bruno Belevan, Parham Hamidi, Nisha Malhotra, and Elyse Yeager

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. You can view a copy of the license at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/.

About

Optimal, Integral, Likely is a free, open-source textbook intended for UBC’s course MATH 105: Integral Calculus with Applications to Commerce and Social Sciences. It is shared under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Source

The source files can be found on GitLab: https://gitlab.math.ubc.ca/ecyeager/OIL.

Most content is remixed from CLP-1 and CLP-2 by Feldman, Rechnitzer, and Yeager. New content includes applications, primarily to economics, written by Belevan, Hamidi, Malhotra, and Yeager. The chapter on probability was prepared by Belevan, Hamidi, Malhotra, and Yeager and incorporates some content from Introductory Statistics by Ilowski and Dean. More detailed information can be found in the text.

Funded by

The development of this text was supported by an OER Implementation Grant, provided through the UBC Open Educational Resources Fund.

 Contact

To report a mistake, or to let us know you’re using this book in a course you’re teaching, please email elyse@math.ubc.ca

Future Projects

    • Update content for UBC calculus syllabus refresh
    • Publish lecture slides
    • Generate HTML version using PreTeXt

Errata

The current version was updated 24 April 2021 after fixing all known issues. Mistakes will be listed here as they are found.

Acknowledgement

UBC Point Grey campus sits on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the xwm θkw y ́ m (Musqueam). Musqueam and UBC have an ongoing relationship sharing insight, knowledge, and labour. Those interested in learning more about this relationship might start here.

Matt Coles of the University of British Columbia has been an important member of the project to develop quality open resources for Math 105. Thanks to Andrew Rechnitzer at UBC Mathematics for help converting LaTeX to PreTeXt.

Previous Versions April 2021: textbookpractice book


 

CV

 

EDUCATION AND CREDENTIALS

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Economics: University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Master of Arts in Economics: University of Delhi School of Economics, New Delhi, India

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, BC        2007 to Present

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF TEACHING (VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS (2015-PRESENT)

Advance curriculum to foster student scholarship & engagement. Collaborate and support colleagues regarding teaching and co-curricular activities. Participate in research pursuits.

Spearheaded the Community-Based Research initiative for seminar course ECON 490 to bring community organizations and students together to enhance learning and research.

Develop and maintain online resources in economics, political science, and related fields In Statistics, Econometrics and statistical computing skills. (https://blogs.ubc.ca/datawithstata/ )

Open Education Resources – OPEN TEXTBOOKS

§ Optimal, Integral, Likely: Optimization, Integral Calculus, And Probability For Students Of Commerce And The Social Sciences, By B. Belevan, P. Hamidi, N. Malhotra, And E. Yeager, Open-Source Textbook, Cc By-Nc-Sa 4.0), 2021.

§ Study Practice Guide: Optimal, Integral, Likely: Optimization, Integral Calculus, And Probability For Students Of Commerce And The Social Sciences, By B. Belevan, P. Hamidi, N. Malhotra, And E. Yeager, Open-Source Textbook, Cc By-Nc-Sa 4.0), 2021.

Courses include: International Relations Major Program; Economic ; Land One Program with the Faculty of Land & Food Systems and the Department of Forestry

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF TEACHING, VSE (2010 TO 2015)
ACTING DIRECTOR, UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS PROGRAMME, VSE (2011)

Piloted numerous UBC initiatives to enhance student learning. Developed, Evaluated and implemented Curricula to incorporate asynchronous content and social media.

Designed and taught VSE’s first flexible learning course, Introduction to Microeconomics. The course replaces 15% of traditional lectures with online tutorials to incorporate active learning in class.

Initiated an intensive 3-day preparatory course for International Relations (IR) students enrolled in ECON 355: Introduction to International Trade. Now hosted online as a program resource.

Introduced Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS) to engender collaborative research skills in VSE.

Undertook (Competitive) Flexible Learning Initiative to construct an online resource repository (lectures, pre-lecture quizzes and peer assessments) for ECON 101.

Courses included: Introduction to Microeconomics, International Relations, and Applied Economics.

Peer Mentoring – Cheryl Fu, 2013; Robert Gateman 2014; Ashok Kotwal, 2015; Thomas S., 2015

SESSIONAL LECTURER:

Economics (2007 To 2009); Faculty Of Land & Food Systems (2008)

Devised and instructed courses on a variety of economics topics.

Manage a YouTube educational channel on economics as a resource for UBC students and beyond.

Courses included: Applied Economics; Introductory Microeconomics; International Trade; Population, Gender and Global Health; Global Food Markets.

ADDITIONAL EXPERIENCE

Consultant, Development Economics Research Group | The World Bank, USA

Consultant, Operations Evaluation Department (OED) | The World Bank, USA

Research Associate | Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations, New Delhi, India

Lecturer | University of Delhi, Department of Economics, New Delhi, India

Business Analyst | Thomas Cook, New Delhi, India

INVITED WORKSHOPS & PRESENTATIONS

International Development Research Center (IDRC) – Invited to participate in the Asian Regional Consultation for Social and Economic Development Programs Jakarta, Indonesia, 2014

IDRC – Invited by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) Department of Foreign Affairs Trade and Development to present “Creating Leaders: Impact at Scale and Visibility”, Jakarta, Indonesia, 2014

Delhi School of Economics – Presented “Indoor Air Pollution and Stunting”, New Delhi, India, 2013

Cida – Presented “Food Affordability and Nutrition Security: Role of Formal and Informal Education”, Quebec, Canada, 2010

SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES (SELECTED)

Arts Curriculum Committeea member of the UBC Senate curriculum development committee that represents all departments in the arts faculty, 2017 to 2019

Arts Co-op Program – Promoted and encouraged economics undergraduates to participate in the program, which saw a 90% increase in economics student enrollment, 2013

UBC Learning Exchange – Presenter at “Livability in Vancouver” conference hosted by this outreach initiative for the communities of Vancouver Downtown Eastside neighborhoods, 2013

The UBC Mixer – Interdisciplinary partnerships between courses, instructors and students, 2011

Research FellowCanadian Agricultural Trade Policy Research Network, 2009

Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada – analyzing the effects of Canada’s preferential trade agreements and proposing future strategies, 2007

Committee work – Served on various committees: Instructor Recruiting, Promotion/Merit Review, Communications, Alumni relations, and SHHRC Arts Co-op, VSE Program Review & UBC CBL community-based learning.

Journal Review – Reviewed papers for Public Health and Nutrition, PLOS ONE, Journal of Human Development, Maternal and Child Health Journal, Canadian Public Policy, and Contemporary Economic Policy

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP (Selected)

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP WORKSHOPEstablished the draft impact framework for the articulation of educational leadership activities for professional development and the promotion and tenure process for this workshop conducted by CTLT and the Dean of Arts Office, 2017

ECONOMICS ARTICULATION MEETINGS“How to Use Blended Learning Tools in Economics Introductory Courses”: workshop for economics instructors across UBC, 2015

FACULTY WORKSHOP ON ACTIVE LEARNING“Improving Student Engagement in Technology-Enhanced Classrooms: What Works, What Matters and Why,” Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology’s Summer Institute, UBC, 2014.

Teaching and Learning Assistance to Accommodate Flexible/Blended Learning Faculty Workshop “The Flipped Lab: How to Collaborate with Teaching Assistants to Support the Flipped Classroom”, CTLT Institute, UBC, 2014

Multimedia Workshop “Using Multimedia Technologies in Teaching Economics to Enhance Learning and Analytical Skills”, CTLT Institute, UBC, 2014 Link

The Evaluation WorkshopCentre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, CTLT Institute, UBC, 2014

GRADUATE STUDENT TRAINING PROGRAMConducted a 5-module (15 hours) training program for the incoming graduate teaching assistants.

BLOG ON TEACHING AND EDUCATION called Flexible Learning. Incorporated social media into the approach to engage technology-savvy students and create a more multifaceted academic experience.

JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS

Gender and Global Health

“Child Malnutrition, Infant Feeding Practices, and Nutrition Information: Evidence from India.” Vancouver. A Human Right Based Approach to Development in India (2019) UBC press.

“Why Are There Delays In Seeking Treatment For Childhood Diarrhoea In India?” (with Ravi Prakash Upadhyay), Acta Pediatrica, (2013).

The Role of Maternal Diet and Iron-Folic Acid Supplements in Influencing Birth Weight: Evidence from India’s National Family Health Survey” (with Nick Choy), (2014) accepted for publication in Journal Of Tropical Pediatrics, Oxford University Press.

“Inadequate Feeding Of Infant And Young Children In India: Lack Of Nutritional Information Or Food Affordability?” Public Health Nutrition,  (2012).

“Domestic Violence And Women’s Autonomy In Developing Countries: Theory And Evidence,” (with Mukesh Eswaran) Canadian Journal of Economics, 44(4), (2011).

Risky Behavior and HIV Prevalence Among Zambian Men,(with Jonathan Yang) Journal of Biosocial Science, 43(2), (2011), Cambridge University Press.

“The Hazard Of Starting The Smoking Habit Among Canadian Population,” (with Brahim Boudarbat), International Journal of Economic Perspectives, 2(4), (2008).

International Trade and development

“The Users Of Lumber And The US-Canada Softwood Lumber Agreement: An Event Study,” (with Sumeet Gulati) Contemporary Economic Policy, 28, (2009).

“Effectiveness Of The Canadian Antidumping Regime,” (with Horatiu Rus) Canadian Public Policy, 35(2), (2009).

“Antidumping Duties In The Agriculture Sector: Trade Restricting Or Trade Deflecting?”  (with Horatiu Rus, and Shinan Kassam), Global Economy Journal, 8(2), (2008).

“Liberalization And Protection: Antidumping Duties In The Indian Pharmaceutical Industry,” (with Shavin Malhotra) Journal of Economic Policy Reform, 11(2), (2008).

“Anti-Dumping And Market Power In The Agriculture Sector, With A Special Case Study Of Fresh Tomatoes Industry,” (with Kathy Baylis), The Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, 9(1), (2008).

“Signaling Costs: Why Don’t More Firms Petition For Protection?” Business and Politics 10.1 (2008).

“Investing In An Emerging Market: Evidence From US Firms Investing In India,” (with Shavin Malhotra), Competitiveness Review, 17(1), (2007).

“Estimating Export Response In Canadian Provinces To The US-Canada Softwood Lumber Agreement,” (with Sumeet Gulati) Canadian Public Policy, 32(2), (2006)

Pedagogy

“Asynchronous Video: A Powerful Way to Teach, Present, and Communicate with Students,” Faculty Focus, Jun 14, 2021

“Implementing Active Learning and Student-Centered Pedagogy in Large Classes, Blended and Flipped Learning,” Faculty Focus, Nov 27, 2019.

“Experimenting with Facebook in the College Classroom,” Jun 10, Faculty Focus, Jun 10, 2013.

Seminars in Applied Research Methods: Designing Instructional Strategies for a Seminar Course, Syllabus Jornal, (2013).

OTHER PUBLICATIONS

“Child Malnutrition: Why Wealth Is not The Only Problem,” LiveMint & The Wall Street Journal, Oct 8, 2012. Also, see Ideasforindia.org Oct 8, 2012.

“Nutrition Education Needed To Combat Child Malnutrition In India.” Kaiser GH Update, Oct 9, 2012. Kaiser’s Global Health Update, Malnutrition. http://www.globalhealthhub.org/2012/10/09/nutrition-education-needed-to-combat-child-malnutrition-in-india/

“Nutrition, A Vital Nutrient Of Curriculum,” interviewed by Dipin Damodharan, Education Insider, DC media, India, (2012).

“Growing Preferential Trade Agreements Across The Globe: Lessons For Canada,” research report, Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, (2007). http://www.asiapacific.ca/analysis/pubs/pdfs/rr/2007/ptas_in_asia_apr07.pdf.

“West Virginia Economic Outlook for Preston County,” (with George Hammond), Bureau of Business and Economic Research, College of Business and Economics, West Virginia University, (1998). http://www.prestonwv.com/outlook/pco.htm.

GRANTS

UBC Vancouver OER Fund Implementation Grant (OER), UBC, Competitive,  “Transition Math 105 From Traditional Textbook to OER” 24,031, (with PI- ELYSE YEAGER), 2018-2020

Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund at UBC (TLEF), Competitive, Strategies for Effective Design and Implementation of Collaborative Peer Learning Activities, 19,604, 2020 Arts IT, with 10 Arts Faculties

Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund at UBC (TLEF), Competitive Prepare Online Resources, 25,000, 2018 -2019

Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund at UBC (TLEF), Competitive, To incorporate Flexible learning in first-year Econ Courses, 80,000, 2013 with ( Clive Chapple)

Major Collaborative Research Initiatives (MCRI), UBC, Non-Competitive, Travel and Research funded by the program, 10,000, 2012, from Dr. Pitman Potter’s grant.

TARGET INE, (SSHRC INE Collaborative Research Initiative), Competitive, Research Grant, 27,000, 2006

Canadian Agricultural Trade Policy Research Network, CATPRN, Competitive, Research Grant, 10,000, 2006.

SERVICES -WITH/FOR UBC

Recognized for adapting “pedagogical approach in partnering with diverse community organizations and enabling students to engage in community-based projects” in undergrad Econ 490. Director, UBC-Community Learning Initiative (UBC-CLI)

Curriculum Consultation: St. Regis Secondary School, Independent high school, Vancouver. Assisting in developing a 12th-year economic course, which focuses on student engagement, community-based learning, within the ‘BC Ministry of Education’ guidelines, 16 march-31may 2021

Certificate of Participation, Faculty in Residence Speaker Series, from Student Housing and Hospitality Services Faculty in Residence Program. Residence Life at the UBC, Dec 17, 2012

SERVICE ACADEMIC COMMUNITY

University of Management & Technology – a member of the Conference Advisory and Technical Board reviewing proposed papers for presentation, 2017 to Present

UBC Psychology Department – Acted as a native Hindi voice for phonemic distinctions in experimental research on speech perception, 2011

Vancouver Rent Bank, NICCS.

§ a member of the advisory board, 2012 to 2015.

§ Designed the client survey for the organization;

§ Conducted program analysis of socio-economic characteristics of loan applicants, 2014-2015; Evaluation Report of the Vancouver Rent Bank (2015)

Indian Journal of Nutrition – Editorial Board member, 2016 to present

Arya Samaj Educational & Cultural Society of British Columbia – Fund-raising & performances at the cultural programme, 2010 to 2013 and 2017